Highlights of the Complaint

A pattern of behavior

 
 

1. Question of Trump's net worth

 
 

Donald Trump's actual net worth has been in question for years. An article in the Washington Post on April 20, 2018, by Jonathan Greenberg addresses the issue in depth.

Greenberg's article says that as he worked on the Forbes rankings of the 400 richest people in the 1980s, Trump inflated his holdings and used a fictitious person through which to report them. The complaint conveys that Trump has "habitually" used made-up people to speak for him, to promote himself and to the media.

Evaluating Trump's net worth has been a financial-world parlor game for years, Vanity Fair wrote in 2016. And during the past decade, several reporters and Trump colleagues have hinted that his net worth may not be as high as he wishes it to appear, estimating that it may be less than half of what he claims. Journalist Timothy O'Brien, who saw Trump's tax returns but is legally prevented from talking about them in detail, has implied that Trump's income is much lower than he often suggests.

“Journalist Timothy O'Brien, who saw Trump's tax returns but is legally prevented from talking about them in detail, has implied that Trump's income is much lower than he often suggests.”

— Vanity Fair, May 2016

 
 
 

2. Trump's conflicts of interest

 
 

Conflicts of interest have been repeatedly raised as an issue for Trump, according to the complaint. This is a concern of good character. For example, Trump said that he would divest from the 19 other U.S. businesses for which he has liquor licenses. He has not done so, instead choosing to transfer his business interests to his sons through a revocable trust. This trust must pay Trump at his request.

In January, the nonpartisan watchdog group Public Citizens released a report citing more than 60 trade groups, foreign governments, Republican candidates and others stayed at or held events at resorts and properties linked to Trump during his first year in office, which represent “unprecedented conflicts of interest” because he has not divested from properties he owns or carries his name, the report says.

 Inside Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., home of Benjamin's Bar and many conflicts of interest.

Inside Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., home of Benjamin's Bar and many conflicts of interest.

 
 
 

3. Trump's lawsuits

 
 

The District of Columbia and state of Maryland have each sued Trump for violating the Foreign Emoluments and the Domestic Emoluments Clauses of the U.S. Constitution by accepting financial benefits from foreign benefits from foreign governments and federal and state governments through commercial transactions with the Trump International Hotel. The complaint contends that the allegations are relevant in terms of good character, whether Trump is immune to such suits, as he contends.

Perhaps even more disturbing were findings of an exhaustive nationwide analysis by USA Today of Trump's legal affairs leading up to the 2016 election titled “Trump and the Law.” The reports says that the then-candidate had been party to roughly 3,500 legal entanglements in federal and state courts, ranging from skirmishes with casino patrons to million-dollar real estate suits to personal defamation lawsuits, over a 30-year period. From not paying vendors to ripping off students of “Trump University,” the lawsuits say a lot about his character.